The lamb

the lamb song

This poem, like many of the Songs of Innocence, accepts what Blake saw as the more positive aspects of conventional Christian belief. These are also the characteristics from which the child-speaker approaches the ideas of nature and of God.

Many of the poems in the Songs of Innocence have counterparts in the Songs of Experience.

The lamb william blake pdf

Many of the poems in the Songs of Innocence have counterparts in the Songs of Experience. Yet by answering his own question, the child converts it into a rhetorical one, thus counteracting the initial spontaneous sense of the poem. In your life, are there clear cut boundaries between innocence and experience, good and evil? If you gave him a Rorschach test where you look at a random pattern of ink and say what comes to mind Blake would probably say, "Lamb…Another lamb…newborn lamb…Lamb doing gymnastics…" In his poem titled "The Chimney Sweep," he writes that the shape of some poor kid's shaved head is "curled like a lamb's back. Why should you read this seemingly childish poem about a lamb? The logic of "The Lamb" is that God creates lambs and that lambs are sweet and gentle, so God must be sweet and gentle. The first stanza is rural and descriptive, while the second focuses on abstract spiritual matters and contains explanation and analogy. But the division of daily life into periods of "innocence" and "experience" — two sides of the same coin, really — is something that we grapple with every day. The poem ends with the child bestowing a blessing on the lamb. We think Blake gives Dr. It sounds like something you might see embroidered beneath an image of the unbearably cute creature and placed in a pretty frame to hang on someone's bathroom wall. They offer a good instance of how Blake himself stands somewhere outside the perspectives of innocence and experience he projects. These poems complement each other to produce a fuller account than either offers independently. Repetition in the first and last couplet of each stanza makes these lines into a refrain, and helps to give the poem its song-like quality. But it does not provide a completely adequate doctrine, because it fails to account for the presence of suffering and evil in the world.

How so? We learn Blake's two main reasons why lambs are so awesome: 1 they are soft, happy, and make cool noises; 2 they are associated with Jesus Christ, whom the speaker of this poem regards as the savior of the world. That lambs have soft fur or tigers like to hang out in forests should come as news to no one.

In your life, are there clear cut boundaries between innocence and experience, good and evil?

the lamb and the tyger

Why should you read this seemingly childish poem about a lamb? The logic of "The Lamb" is that God creates lambs and that lambs are sweet and gentle, so God must be sweet and gentle. The traditional image of Jesus as a lamb underscores the Christian values of gentleness, meekness, and peace.

the lamb william blake theme

The positive side of innocence is joy and optimism, while the bad side is naivety. Or do you see the world more like Blake did? Blake believed that life could be viewed from two different perspectives, or "states": innocence and experience.

The logic of "The Tyger" is that God also creates Tigers, and tigers are savage and terrifying, so…uh-oh. One other thing to know about William Blake: he is like a graffiti artist in the sense that the meaning of his words oftentimes cannot be separated from their visual appearance.

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The Lamb by William Blake