Arguments youth sports

positive effects of sports on youth

It is high time that the sensible people, the silent majority, take over this conversation. Please get together with the coach or club directors and fellow parents and confront the behavior.

Why sports are bad for students

Parents, coaches, sports medicine professionals, and organizers are all culpable. Great athletes love the game, work hard and improve everyday, and the rest takes care of itself. Far too many teams fill their rosters NOT for the benefit of the players who get less playing time or none at all but for the bottom line of the club. Maybe the absurdity of this lawsuit is what will wake enough of us up. I am sure there are many sides to this story, and I have only read the one article. Provides an ego trip: There is a great deal of narcissistic appeal in sports competition. As soon as some children enter second or third grade, their parents scramble to place them on youth travel teams, which will set them up for middle-school travel teams, which will set them up for high-school athletic excellence, which will make them more competitive for admissions and scholarships at select colleges. The seductiveness of the youth sports experience draws those involved into a tangle of emotions. Besides, the most useful kind of competition that I've experienced in my life is the competition I have within myself to be the best version of myself that I can be. Instead, Norway is an athletic juggernaut. We are to blame because as a collective we have done nothing about this, even though the great parents and coaches are the majority. I don't think that competition is either good or bad. Nevertheless, there is no doubt in my mind that when done purposeful and developmentally appropriate manner that places the needs of the children well ahead of winning, competitive sports can and should be a great experience for kids. In his book, Dream Hoarders, the economist Richard Reeves wrote that economic mobility in the U.

So here are my 15 reasons why experiencing competition is good for kids: 1. Because they wanted to get their daughter noticed by college coaches.

cons of competitive sports

Rather it is how we think about it and cope with it makes it good or bad. Data shows that high school students who play sport are less likely to drop out.

impact of sports on youth

Or you could follow the kids. I am not saying that is the case here, but it is the case in many places. Competition teaches us to bring our best effort.

Just be a parent, let the coach be the coach, and let the game belong to your child.

Why competitive sports are bad

And, when we place winning as the most important objective of youth sports, then competition is toxic. Just be a parent, let the coach be the coach, and let the game belong to your child. But that is not why I wrote this article. Both male and female athletes were more likely to eat fruit and vegetables, and less likely to engage in smoking and illicit drug-taking. People like it. Out-of-control parents Every parent who has been on the sidelines has seen instances of emotional abuse that are too common in the world of youth sports: the mortified child whose mother is screaming at the referee about a "blown call", or the despondent child who is being verbally attacked by his or her parent or coach for some perceived lack of effort or for making a "dumb" mistake It has become fashionable to blame "pushy parents" for many of the excesses seen in children's sports. To be fair to this coach, it seems he did try to make amends. In so doing, they—in effect— snatch precious opportunities away from the less fortunate. Competition brings those butterflies out, so we can work on managing them. The athlete should have toughed it out, the parents should have found a better venue to deal with this, the coach should have known better, and the league could have done more. Competition drives us to learn at a faster rate and perform at a higher level. While setting goals and making a plan to reach them can be done outside of competition, competition helps provide deadlines and progress checks on our goals. Remarkably, teams that release their scores online can face expulsion from the Norwegian confederation of sports. Too many of us treat youth sports as an investment in a future scholarship, and thus push for more and more at younger and younger ages. As soon as some children enter second or third grade, their parents scramble to place them on youth travel teams, which will set them up for middle-school travel teams, which will set them up for high-school athletic excellence, which will make them more competitive for admissions and scholarships at select colleges.

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Dark Side of Youth Sports